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Summer Jobs: Let the Hunt Begin

In the summer, looking for a job is becoming worst than a lioness looking for some fresh meat to feed her offspring. Any piece of advice is good to take. So here are few tips to help you to find your way in the confusing and tough process of looking for a job.

 1)Be Ready

Make sure you always have an up-to-date CV and a cover letter. Update it as often as you can, don’t neglect any previous jobs or important tasks you have undertaken because any experience does matter. You can find many good templates on the internet, indeed Kent University’s website gives good pieces of advice here. Once you’ve written your CV have someone else read it – as many people as you can – spelling and grammatical mistakes can be crippling. Don’t forget to include any experience or achievement you are proud of on your CV. Your aim is to highlight the qualities that make you someone unique and interesting to hire: you have to stand out from the crowd! Because keep in mind that employers are skimming through thousands of cv’s and cover letters a day, this is why your CV must be clear and original.

2) Be open-minded 

If you’re looking for a job, take a chance on every opportunity that comes across; don’t be fussy! Though some jobs may seem undesirable  on paper. Make it clear in your head that no job will be a loss of time and you’ll gain something from it, no matter what you’re doing!

3) Necessity but Dignity

Even though money is an issue for you, a job shouldn’t include you selling your soul, your self-respect or your body for money. From the beginning, make it clear with your employer that relation you have with him/her is strictly professional for the avoidance of doubt.

4) Try Everywhere 

You can find classified adds on the internet. StudentJob is pretty good for this kind of research. Also don’t hesitate to go inside shops to canvass employers because many of them are waiting for students to come inside their store to show motivation. Never be afraid to ask, you may feel dumb in the moment but once you get your job you won’t anymore. Prick up your ear to every conversation you’re hearing, on the street, at a coffee, at the shop etc.. Someone may need help from students for the summer. I found a job by listening to some customers. They were buying some flowers and they were talking about the fact that the florist was their newspapers flowers supplier. So I asked them where they worked and they told me they were journalists. I said I was a journalism student, and they asked why I wouldn’t do an internship with them during the summer. It was out of the blue. The next day I was dropping them my CV and I eventually got the job.

5) Few examples of interesting jobs

  • Au Pair: This is a really nice job, you can do it abroad. You can work for some lovely families anywhere around the globe. You just have to pay your flight to go there and your personal dispenses. You’ll have to take care of their children and in exchange they will provide meal and accommodation for free. You can see further details on AuPairWorld.
  • You can try being a Tour Guide, if there’s a place you really like and you know its history. During summer, Tour Guides are very appreciated due to the amount of tourists.
  • Ambassador for brands: During the summer many brands are often looking for students to champion their products.

You now have all the elements for a successful summer job hunt!

5 House Hunting Tips for First Year Students

Time flies! 6 months have already passed since the beginning of uni, and although there are several months before everybody goes home for the summer, now is the best time to start looking for a place to live next year; before it’s too late! It might seem early, but if you don’t motivate yourself to find a house now, it will become an issue for next year.

A lot of students are not allowed to stay in their halls beyond their first year and therefore need to move. One of the reasons a lot of freshers choose to stay in halls during their first year is that they’re often attending uni in a new place and therefore don’t know anybody. Halls of residence are a great way to meet and bond with a lot of people. Once you get used to your new campus and have made plenty of friends moving becomes easier.

Living in a house comes with it’s advantages such as it’s generally cheaper than halls and there are way less restrictions (eg anybody can stay over; guests don’t have to sign in whenever they want to pay you a visit).

When looking for houses many things must be taken into consideration. Here are some tips to help you in your hunt for your new home.

House-hunting-1) Housemates 

Firstly, make sure you know the people you are going to move in with well and also that you all have the same objectives. For example, it’s not going to be easy to cope with party animals if you’re the kind of person that is very calm and focused on your studies. Spending time with good friends is not the same as living with them. You’ll have to put up with  them all day long and being in someones presence all the time can actually lead to tension or even quarrels.

Cleaning can also be an issue because not everybody has the same perception of it, so make it clear from the very beginning how often chores should be carried out and who should be in charge of the rota (a cleaning schedule

2) Location 

When looking for a house you want to find somewhere close to local amenities and with easy transport links. Try to check if there’s a bus stop nearby, how far the rail station is from the house (it’s not the most important, but it’s not very convenient to walk endless miles when you want to take the train to go home). It’s also useful if there’s somewhere you can do your grocery shopping nearby. Many students can’t drive so it can be difficult getting home with numerous shopping bags.

If you’re thinking about subscribing to the gym then make sure there is one near to where you will be moving to. You may say at the beginning of the academic year that it’s fine and that you’ll make an effort to get there but after your first essays I doubt you’ll have the courage to really do it. The same for goes for the library. Make sure it’s close to where you’ll  be living because it’s widely acknowledged that a place full of flatmates, noise and other distractions is not the best place on earth for concentration. So sometimes it’s preferable to go to a peaceful place to work.

Also, make sure that the house is not located in a dodgy area. It’s not very nice to travel in an unsafe area after a party or when it gets dark early in winter especially for girls.

3)Utilities 

The number of bathrooms can be a problem when people from the same course are sharing a house so be careful towards that, the shower can get busy very quickly. If you are somewhere with one bathroom it’s also advisable that it has a second toilet also. There’s nothing arriving home desperate for the loo only to discover the bathroom is occupied.

A washing machine is essential. In winter you don’t want to be walking for miles to find a decent laundrette. A tumble dryer is always a bonus but it isn’t the end of the world if there isn’t one, you’ll just have to hang your clothes up to dry.

4) Landlords

Asking the landlord the following questions when viewing houses will help to avoid any bad surprises:

  • How much is the rent and is it inclusive (gas, broadband, bills etc)?
  • How long is the contract?
  • What are the terms of the deposit? Who will have to pay if there are any technical problems (a water leak can be costly)?

Also make sure you check that any appliances provided work properly before moving in as some landlords have been  known to provide faulty appliances only to blame the new tenants for the damage!

5) Where to Look

You can utilise the services of an agency to help you in finding your dream house (don’t dream too big though, don’t be a diva! You won’t find Beyonce’s villa with your student budget). Sometimes the agencies are just making money on the back of students although online property searches can allow you to deal directly with the landlords. Nevertheless, to avoid agency fees you can use some reliable websites such as:

To conclude, if you haven’t started yet it’s time to seriously take responsibility for your house hunt because if you don’t do so now, others will take the best houses and you won’t be left with a lot of choice.

 

 

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